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10 of America’s regional hot dog styles

10 of America’s regional hot dog styles

From Boston’s Fenway Frank to Washington DC’s Half Smoke, Musement shares 10 of America’s most popular regional hot dog styles.

As Labor Day approaches, barbecuing seems like a no-brainer. Among the burgers, ribs, chicken, and whatever else is cooking, hot dogs likely have a place on the table.

These hand-held eats are so essential to America’s food identity, that regional style variations abound. In their honor, here’s a look at 10 of America’s most popular regional hot dog styles.

1. New York Dog

New York boasts plenty of must-eats, and hot dogs stand front and center as one of the Big Apple’s most ubiquitous foods, with vendors on just about every corner peddling their franks. A typical New York dog consists of beef and topped with mustard and sauerkraut. Though you can opt for ketchup if your heart desires.

2. The Chicago Dog

Always with a Vienna beef dog, the Chicago Dog is served in a poppy seed bun and topped with mustard, white onions, green sweet pickle relish, a dill pickle, tomatoes, pickled sport peppers and a dash of celery salt. If you’re visiting Chicago, you’ll learn first hand that having one is just never enough.

3. The Fenway Frank

As quintessential ballpark food, it’s no surprise that Boston’s Fenway Park, home to the Red Sox, has a frank of its own. The Fenway Frank is a beef and pork dog that’s boiled then grilled then placed inside a New England-style split-top bun and, topped with mustard and relish, though many chose to throw some ketchup into the mix.

4. Sonoran Dog

Having originated in Hermosillo, the capital of the Mexican state of Sonora, the Sonoran dog traveled north and is now popular in Arizona, Phoenix, and Tuscon in particular. A bacon-wrapped hot dog is grilled then placed in a steamed bolillo bun. Of the several toppings, the most typical include pinto beans, chopped tomatoes and onions, mustard, and jalapenos. Mayo, avocados, green sauce, and shredded cheese are also popular options.

5. Kansas City-Style Dog

Typical of Kansas City, Missouri, the dog is usually made from all pork then set inside a sesame seed bun before brown mustard, sauerkraut, and melted Swiss cheese top it.

6. The Texas Tommy

Don’t let its name fool you—the Texas Tommy was invented in Philadelphia in the 1950s. An all-beef dog is sliced open and stuffed with cheese Whiz then wrapped with bacon, grilled, and tucked inside a warm bun. You can also find this in Canada where it’s known as the Whistle Dog.

7. Cincinnati Cheese Coney

Pure bliss for cheese lovers, the Cincinnati Cheese Coney consists of a pork and beef frank topped with Cincinnati chili, a spiced meat sauce typical of the city, mustard, and onions and then coated with a blanket of shredded cheddar cheese. Note: A Cincinnati Coney is the same setup sans cheese.

8. Seattle Dog

A variation with a base of frankfurter or bratwurst, the Seattle Dog is grilled, sliced in half, tossed into a toasted bun, coated with cream cheese, and finally topped with sauteed onion with several other options such as jalapenos, cabbage, relish, sriracha, barbecue sauce, and salsa. Take your pick from one of the various vendors around Seattle who prepare them.

9. The Half Smoke, Washington DC

This bulky sausage has been smoked and grilled, placed inside a standard hot dog bun, that’s topped with a heap of chili, mustard. Ben’s Chili Bowl serves up the best and most beloved version of this Washington DC staple.

10. The Red Snapper

It should come as no surprise that Maine’s hot dogs are the same hue as its most signature crustaceans. The lobster capital is known for Red Snapper hot dogs, named for the snappy lamb casing sheath that’s dyed a distinct shade of red. It’s then placed inside a toasted hot dog bun and topped with Raye’s classic yellow mustard, a Maine specialty.

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