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7 of the world’s most incredible scuba dive sites

7 of the world’s most incredible scuba dive sites

Whether it’s wrecks and reefs that you’re after or whales and stingrays; these seven dive sites will leave you speechless at their beauty!

Gliding peacefully beneath the waves with brightly coloured shoals of fish flitting around you and beautiful coral reefs below, the underwater world is an exquisite place full of amazing sights to explore.

Whether you are a qualified pro or a diving novice, scuba diving is a magical experience like no other. As 70 percent of the planet is covered in water, there is a myriad of majestic dive sites for you to discover. With each location around the world seemingly more breathtakingly beautiful than the last, here are seven dive sites that you don’t want to miss out on!

1. The Great Blue Hole, Belize

Home to the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef, Belize is an absolutely incredible place to scuba dive. The undoubted highlight being the Great Blue Hole. Visible from space, the giant marine sinkhole is blessed with crystal-clear water, so it’s easy to take in all of the details of the astounding cave systems, rock formations, and stalactites that surround you. While there is not all that much marine life on display, the unique experience of diving in such a gigantic sinkhole with such great visibility makes it one of the most famous dive sites in the world.

 

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2. Raja Ampat Islands, Indonesia

Replete with stunning dive sites such as those of Mioskun, Blue Magic, and Melissa’s Garden, the waters around the Raja Ampat Islands teem with marine life. Over 1,500 different species of fish can be found swimming about in huge shoals. If that isn’t remarkable enough, the amazing range of coral species makes it one of the planet’s most biodiverse areas. Lying at the heart of the Coral Triangle, this tiny corner of Indonesia is well worth exploring as the underwater scenery is astounding wherever you go.

3. Stingray City, Grand Cayman

A mecca for divers, Grand Cayman in the Caribbean has stunning coral reefs strewn with mysterious wrecks and shimmering shoals of fish. One of the most unforgettable dive sites is Stingray City where hundreds upon hundreds of the gentle creatures flit about you in the warm water. The dive only takes you down to around 40 feet, but watching the stingrays glide peacefully amongst the sandbanks and stroking them as they swim by is indescribable.

 

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4. The Yongala, Australia

One of the world’s best shipwrecks, the Yongala unfortunately sunk off of the coast of Queensland, Australia in 1911. Nowadays its coral-crusted remains are a popular dive site. Largely intact, the shipwreck lies between 50 to 100 feet below the waves. Many schools of fish, manta rays and reef sharks can be seen swarming around the wreck. One of the best times to go is between July and September, when you might even see Minke whales pass by the wreck as they migrate along the coast.

 

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5. Blue Corner, Palau

Full of world-class dive sites, Palau in the Pacific Ocean is a treat – provided that you can handle the strong underwater currents. With an abundance of marine life, coral reefs, and rock formations for you to appreciate, the Blue Corner plays host to more than 1,400 fish and 700 coral species. Feeling the power of the ocean’s pull as you float above the reef tethered to a hook is awe-inspiring — an experience you certainly won’t forget in a hurry.

 

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6. Silfra Gap, Iceland

While many of the world’s best dives sites lie in tropical waters, the Silfra Gap is well worth braving the cold waters. Located in Iceland’s majestic Thingvellir National Park, the underwater rift marks the point where the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates meet. Diving between the rock walls is an experience like no other as you can see the craggy rocks and boulders stretching endlessly away into the murky depths of the ocean.

 

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7. Thistlegorm, Egypt

While incredible dive sites stud the Red Sea, one of the most popular is the wreck of the SS Thistlegorm. A British armed navy ship, which was sunk just off of Ras Mohammed, near Sharm El-Sheikh in Egypt during World War II. A long list of artefacts including tanks, motorbikes, trucks and other wartime supplies can be spotted around the wreck. Barracudas, moray eels, turtles and lionfish also frequent the waters here.

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